Labor Notes

No Casting Couch for Low-Wage Women, But Lots of Sexual Harassment

Steward's Corner - Fri, 2017-10-13 15:18
No Casting Couch for Low-Wage Women, But Lots of Sexual Harassment October 13, 2017 / Jane Slaughter<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

Sexual harassment doesn't happen just to glamorous women in glamorous industries. Since sexual harassment is about power, not sex, it’s not surprising that low-wage women in lousy jobs get a lot of it.

Categories: Labor Notes

No Casting Couch for Low-Wage Women, But Lots of Sexual Harassment

Magazine Stories - Fri, 2017-10-13 15:18
No Casting Couch for Low-Wage Women, But Lots of Sexual Harassment October 13, 2017 / Jane Slaughter<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

Sexual harassment doesn't happen just to glamorous women in glamorous industries. Since sexual harassment is about power, not sex, it’s not surprising that low-wage women in lousy jobs get a lot of it.

Categories: Labor Notes

Labor's Stake in the Fight for Veterans' Health Care

Steward's Corner - Thu, 2017-10-12 11:20
Labor's Stake in the Fight for Veterans' Health Care October 12, 2017 / Suzanne Gordon and Ian Hoffmann<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

In January President Trump delivered on his promise to shrink the federal government: he announced a hiring freeze, despite thousands of federal job vacancies.

As a candidate, Trump campaigned as a great friend of veterans. He pledged to make big improvements in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), the arm of the Veterans Administration (VA) that operates the largest health care system in the country.

But Trump’s hiring freeze deepened an already existing staffing crisis at VHA hospitals and clinics throughout the U.S., where there are 49,000 vacant positions.

Categories: Labor Notes

Labor's Stake in the Fight for Veterans' Health Care

Magazine Stories - Thu, 2017-10-12 11:20
Labor's Stake in the Fight for Veterans' Health Care October 12, 2017 / Suzanne Gordon and Ian Hoffmann<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

In January President Trump delivered on his promise to shrink the federal government: he announced a hiring freeze, despite thousands of federal job vacancies.

As a candidate, Trump campaigned as a great friend of veterans. He pledged to make big improvements in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), the arm of the Veterans Administration (VA) that operates the largest health care system in the country.

But Trump’s hiring freeze deepened an already existing staffing crisis at VHA hospitals and clinics throughout the U.S., where there are 49,000 vacant positions.

Categories: Labor Notes

New York Teamsters Block Union-Busting Move

Steward's Corner - Tue, 2017-10-10 09:25

New York City-area movers packed up the inflatable rats—all three of them—and declared victory in late August. For two months, while members of Teamsters Local 814 were locked out of their jobs, they had mobilized in the streets to protest a local company’s decision to drop its unionized movers and warehouse workers.

Categories: Labor Notes

New York Teamsters Block Union-Busting Move

Magazine Stories - Tue, 2017-10-10 09:25

New York City-area movers packed up the inflatable rats—all three of them—and declared victory in late August. For two months, while members of Teamsters Local 814 were locked out of their jobs, they had mobilized in the streets to protest a local company’s decision to drop its unionized movers and warehouse workers.

Categories: Labor Notes

Public Sector Right to Work: Gateway to Combating All Unions

Steward's Corner - Fri, 2017-10-06 10:50

Corporations are making the most headway on their anti-worker agenda by buying state legislatures, argues Gordon Lafer in his new book, The One Percent Solution: How Corporations Are Remaking America One State at a Time.

An excerpt from Chapter Two of the book, “Deunionizing the Private Sector,” is provided below. For more, see the full interview with Lafer on the Labor Notes website.

Categories: Labor Notes

Public Sector Right to Work: Gateway to Combating All Unions

Magazine Stories - Fri, 2017-10-06 10:50

Corporations are making the most headway on their anti-worker agenda by buying state legislatures, argues Gordon Lafer in his new book, The One Percent Solution: How Corporations Are Remaking America One State at a Time.

An excerpt from Chapter Two of the book, “Deunionizing the Private Sector,” is provided below. For more, see the full interview with Lafer on the Labor Notes website.

Categories: Labor Notes

Interview: The Billionaire Battle Plan

Steward's Corner - Fri, 2017-10-06 10:16
Interview: The Billionaire Battle Plan October 06, 2017 / Gordon Lafer<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

It's national politics that get the headlines, but corporations are making the most headway on their anti-worker agenda by buying state legislatures. So argues Gordon Lafer in his new book, The One Percent Solution: How Corporations Are Remaking America One State at a Time.

You may think you know how pervasive corporate money is in politics, but Lafer, a labor educator at the University of Oregon, reveals a nationally coordinated, corporate-funded strategy that's gained steam since 2010.

Categories: Labor Notes

Interview: The Billionaire Battle Plan

Magazine Stories - Fri, 2017-10-06 10:16
Interview: The Billionaire Battle Plan October 06, 2017 / Gordon Lafer<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

It's national politics that get the headlines, but corporations are making the most headway on their anti-worker agenda by buying state legislatures. So argues Gordon Lafer in his new book, The One Percent Solution: How Corporations Are Remaking America One State at a Time.

You may think you know how pervasive corporate money is in politics, but Lafer, a labor educator at the University of Oregon, reveals a nationally coordinated, corporate-funded strategy that's gained steam since 2010.

Categories: Labor Notes

Building Power before Janus–And After: Lessons from CUNY

Steward's Corner - Tue, 2017-10-03 13:01

As recently as 2014, just 22 percent of my co-workers were members of our chapter in our big wall-to-wall union. The rest—some 1,242 employees—paid the “agency fee,” which for us is the same as membership dues. The chapter had been defunct for several years. Few bothered to explain to new employees why it mattered to join and what power might come from engagement.

Categories: Labor Notes

Building Power before Janus–And After: Lessons from CUNY

Magazine Stories - Tue, 2017-10-03 13:01

As recently as 2014, just 22 percent of my co-workers were members of our chapter in our big wall-to-wall union. The rest—some 1,242 employees—paid the “agency fee,” which for us is the same as membership dues. The chapter had been defunct for several years. Few bothered to explain to new employees why it mattered to join and what power might come from engagement.

Categories: Labor Notes

Review: The Big Rig: Trucking and the Decline of the American Dream

Steward's Corner - Mon, 2017-10-02 10:41

Truck drivers seem to have re-entered the public consciousness in 2017—but today our understanding of the occupation is far from the freewheeling “cowboy of the highway” image of the 1970s. It’s also no longer synonymous with “Teamster” or even seen as a desirable job.

Categories: Labor Notes

Review: The Big Rig: Trucking and the Decline of the American Dream

Magazine Stories - Mon, 2017-10-02 10:41

Truck drivers seem to have re-entered the public consciousness in 2017—but today our understanding of the occupation is far from the freewheeling “cowboy of the highway” image of the 1970s. It’s also no longer synonymous with “Teamster” or even seen as a desirable job.

Categories: Labor Notes

Bring the Union Meeting to the Members

Steward's Corner - Thu, 2017-09-28 09:08
Bring the Union Meeting to the Members September 28, 2017 / Joe Fahey<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

How many members attend your union meetings? And how do you feel about that?

Whether it’s just a handful or a hundred, no activist is ever satisfied.

But you can drop a whole load of frustration if you stop expecting a majority of members to travel to the union hall for a two-hour monthly meeting. Thinking about members and meetings in a different way can allow you to bring shorter union meetings to more and more members—at the workplace.

Categories: Labor Notes

Bring the Union Meeting to the Members

Magazine Stories - Thu, 2017-09-28 09:08
Bring the Union Meeting to the Members September 28, 2017 / Joe Fahey<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

How many members attend your union meetings? And how do you feel about that?

Whether it’s just a handful or a hundred, no activist is ever satisfied.

But you can drop a whole load of frustration if you stop expecting a majority of members to travel to the union hall for a two-hour monthly meeting. Thinking about members and meetings in a different way can allow you to bring shorter union meetings to more and more members—at the workplace.

Categories: Labor Notes

From Indonesia to Honduras: How Anti-Sweatshop Activists and Unions Made Severance Pay Mandatory

Steward's Corner - Wed, 2017-09-27 13:33

In August last year Iris Montoya came to work at the Rio Garment factory in San Pedro Sula, Honduras, where she had worked as a sewing machine operator for 11 years. At 11 a.m., the factory lights shut off and management escorted the workers outside, locking the doors behind them.

Management announced that the factory was shutting down operations that very day. Panic broke out. Workers were told to go home, barred from retrieving their belongings, and left without their last week’s pay.

Categories: Labor Notes

From Indonesia to Honduras: How Anti-Sweatshop Activists and Unions Made Severance Pay Mandatory

Magazine Stories - Wed, 2017-09-27 13:33

In August last year Iris Montoya came to work at the Rio Garment factory in San Pedro Sula, Honduras, where she had worked as a sewing machine operator for 11 years. At 11 a.m., the factory lights shut off and management escorted the workers outside, locking the doors behind them.

Management announced that the factory was shutting down operations that very day. Panic broke out. Workers were told to go home, barred from retrieving their belongings, and left without their last week’s pay.

Categories: Labor Notes

Big Business, Political Allies Look to Turn Hurricane Crises to Their Advantage

Steward's Corner - Mon, 2017-09-25 17:03

You have to hand it to Big Business and their minions: in every storm cloud they find a silver lining.

The hazards faced by residents of Texas and Florida (and now Puerto Rico) come not just from the flooding but from business interests eager to take advantage of the crisis to toss out the rules—“it’s an emergency”—and squeeze workers.

Categories: Labor Notes

Big Business, Political Allies Look to Turn Hurricane Crises to Their Advantage

Magazine Stories - Mon, 2017-09-25 17:03

You have to hand it to Big Business and their minions: in every storm cloud they find a silver lining.

The hazards faced by residents of Texas and Florida (and now Puerto Rico) come not just from the flooding but from business interests eager to take advantage of the crisis to toss out the rules—“it’s an emergency”—and squeeze workers.

Categories: Labor Notes
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