Labor Notes

Teachers Carry Strike Spirit into New School Year

Steward's Corner - Tue, 2018-08-28 07:28
Teachers Carry Strike Spirit into New School Year August 28, 2018 / Barbara Madeloni, Samantha Winslow<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

As teachers, school employees, and students head back to school, what’s ahead for the #RedforEd movement?

This spring, teachers mobilized on an unprecedented scale in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Kentucky, Arizona, North Carolina, and Colorado. They protested, walked out, and even held statewide strikes—in states with limited to no collective bargaining rights, where school unions have traditionally focused on state politics.

Categories: Labor Notes

Teachers Carry Strike Spirit into New School Year

Magazine Stories - Tue, 2018-08-28 07:28
Teachers Carry Strike Spirit into New School Year August 28, 2018 / Barbara Madeloni, Samantha Winslow<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

As teachers, school employees, and students head back to school, what’s ahead for the #RedforEd movement?

This spring, teachers mobilized on an unprecedented scale in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Kentucky, Arizona, North Carolina, and Colorado. They protested, walked out, and even held statewide strikes—in states with limited to no collective bargaining rights, where school unions have traditionally focused on state politics.

Categories: Labor Notes

Vote No Sentiment Escalating at UPS

Steward's Corner - Mon, 2018-08-27 10:14
Vote No Sentiment Escalating at UPS August 27, 2018 / Alexandra Bradbury<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

The movement for a no vote keeps growing at UPS.

Each UPS local sent two leaders to the union’s “two-person meeting” August 9 to hear the international union’s sales pitch and decide whether to recommend the agreement to the 270,000 affected members.

It’s typically a rubber-stamping, but this time local leaders had a lot of questions and criticisms. In a voice vote, roughly a third voted against recommending the deal.

Categories: Labor Notes

Vote No Sentiment Escalating at UPS

Magazine Stories - Mon, 2018-08-27 10:14
Vote No Sentiment Escalating at UPS August 27, 2018 / Alexandra Bradbury<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

The movement for a no vote keeps growing at UPS.

Each UPS local sent two leaders to the union’s “two-person meeting” August 9 to hear the international union’s sales pitch and decide whether to recommend the agreement to the 270,000 affected members.

It’s typically a rubber-stamping, but this time local leaders had a lot of questions and criticisms. In a voice vote, roughly a third voted against recommending the deal.

Categories: Labor Notes

Why Missouri 'Right to Work' Went Down in Flames

Steward's Corner - Fri, 2018-08-24 14:47
Why Missouri 'Right to Work' Went Down in Flames August 24, 2018 / Judy Ancel<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

For years I used to say that when you looked at a map of Midwest “right-to-work” states, Missouri stuck into them like a thumb plugging a hole in a wall leaking sludge.

Then a flood of Trump votes netted us a hardcore anti-worker governor, Eric Greitens. The Republican-dominated legislature passed a right-to-work law almost immediately, and Greitens signed it in February 2017.

But Missourians have an unusual constitutional right to a “citizens’ veto” of unpopular laws. So unions began a petition drive to put it to a popular vote.

Categories: Labor Notes

Why Missouri 'Right to Work' Went Down in Flames

Magazine Stories - Fri, 2018-08-24 14:47
Why Missouri 'Right to Work' Went Down in Flames August 24, 2018 / Judy Ancel<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

For years I used to say that when you looked at a map of Midwest “right-to-work” states, Missouri stuck into them like a thumb plugging a hole in a wall leaking sludge.

Then a flood of Trump votes netted us a hardcore anti-worker governor, Eric Greitens. The Republican-dominated legislature passed a right-to-work law almost immediately, and Greitens signed it in February 2017.

But Missourians have an unusual constitutional right to a “citizens’ veto” of unpopular laws. So unions began a petition drive to put it to a popular vote.

Categories: Labor Notes

How New York Taxi Workers Took On Uber and Won

Steward's Corner - Thu, 2018-08-23 10:53
How New York Taxi Workers Took On Uber and Won August 23, 2018 / Chris Brooks<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

This summer, the scrappy union representing 21,000 taxi and for-hire vehicle drivers in New York City scored two groundbreaking victories against the world’s most valuable start-up company.

If Uber was looking for a fight, it found one in the Taxi Workers Alliance.

Categories: Labor Notes

How New York Taxi Workers Took On Uber and Won

Magazine Stories - Thu, 2018-08-23 10:53
How New York Taxi Workers Took On Uber and Won August 23, 2018 / Chris Brooks<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

This summer, the scrappy union representing 21,000 taxi and for-hire vehicle drivers in New York City scored two groundbreaking victories against the world’s most valuable start-up company.

If Uber was looking for a fight, it found one in the Taxi Workers Alliance.

Categories: Labor Notes

Viewpoint: Unions Aren’t Exclusive Clubs—We Fight for All Workers

Steward's Corner - Fri, 2018-08-17 09:16

Editor's note: This viewpoint is part of an ongoing debate about how unions should deal with free riders. Check out previous installments here.

Viewpoints

Introduction: How Should Unions Deal With Free Riders?

Categories: Labor Notes

Viewpoint: Unions Aren’t Exclusive Clubs—We Fight for All Workers

Magazine Stories - Fri, 2018-08-17 09:16

Editor's note: This viewpoint is part of an ongoing debate about how unions should deal with free riders. Check out previous installments here.

Viewpoints

Introduction: How Should Unions Deal With Free Riders?

Categories: Labor Notes

Building a Rapid-Response Network to Defend Immigrant Workers

Steward's Corner - Thu, 2018-08-16 11:39
Building a Rapid-Response Network to Defend Immigrant Workers August 16, 2018 / Dan DiMaggio and Pioneer Valley Workers Center Staff<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

As the Trump administration cracks down on undocumented immigrants, it’s urgent for worker centers and unions to organize to defend immigrant members.

In Western Massachusetts, the Pioneer Valley Workers Center has created a rapid-response network it calls “Sanctuary in the Streets” (SiS). The worker center, founded in 2014, organizes restaurant workers and farmworkers in the area. Worker committees set the network's priorities.

Categories: Labor Notes

Building a Rapid-Response Network to Defend Immigrant Workers

Magazine Stories - Thu, 2018-08-16 11:39
Building a Rapid-Response Network to Defend Immigrant Workers August 16, 2018 / Dan DiMaggio and Pioneer Valley Workers Center Staff<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

As the Trump administration cracks down on undocumented immigrants, it’s urgent for worker centers and unions to organize to defend immigrant members.

In Western Massachusetts, the Pioneer Valley Workers Center has created a rapid-response network it calls “Sanctuary in the Streets” (SiS). The worker center, founded in 2014, organizes restaurant workers and farmworkers in the area. Worker committees set the network's priorities.

Categories: Labor Notes

Review: Labor and the Class Idea in the U.S. and Canada

Steward's Corner - Thu, 2018-08-09 14:35

In 1965, in both Canada and the U.S., about 30 percent of the workforce was represented by unions. This figure, called union density, had been close between the two countries for 50 years. Often, density in the U.S. was a little bit higher than in Canada.

But starting in the mid-1960s, our paths diverged. Union density in the U.S. began to fall, while in Canada it kept climbing.

Canada’s union density peaked at 38 percent in the early 1980s. By 2017 it had fallen to 28.6 percent—but that’s still substantially higher than the 10.7 percent in the U.S.

Categories: Labor Notes

Review: Labor and the Class Idea in the U.S. and Canada

Magazine Stories - Thu, 2018-08-09 14:35

In 1965, in both Canada and the U.S., about 30 percent of the workforce was represented by unions. This figure, called union density, had been close between the two countries for 50 years. Often, density in the U.S. was a little bit higher than in Canada.

But starting in the mid-1960s, our paths diverged. Union density in the U.S. began to fall, while in Canada it kept climbing.

Canada’s union density peaked at 38 percent in the early 1980s. By 2017 it had fallen to 28.6 percent—but that’s still substantially higher than the 10.7 percent in the U.S.

Categories: Labor Notes

Missouri Voters Overwhelmingly Reject ‘Right to Work’

Steward's Corner - Wed, 2018-08-08 15:36

Unions in Missouri are declaring victory after voters shot down a Republican-backed “right-to-work” law by a hefty 2 to 1.

The final vote count was 937,241 against the legislation to 452,075 in favor.

Missouri became the 28th state with a right-to-work law on the books in February 2017, when Republican Governor Eric Greitens signed the law at a ceremony in an abandoned factory.

Categories: Labor Notes

Missouri Voters Overwhelmingly Reject ‘Right to Work’

Magazine Stories - Wed, 2018-08-08 15:36

Unions in Missouri are declaring victory after voters shot down a Republican-backed “right-to-work” law by a hefty 2 to 1.

The final vote count was 937,241 against the legislation to 452,075 in favor.

Missouri became the 28th state with a right-to-work law on the books in February 2017, when Republican Governor Eric Greitens signed the law at a ceremony in an abandoned factory.

Categories: Labor Notes

Viewpoint: How to Talk with Nonunion Workers about ‘Right to Work’

Steward's Corner - Tue, 2018-08-07 15:11

Today Missouri voters are at the polls in a referendum to repeal the state’s “right-to-work” law, thanks to the heroic efforts of union members and allies who gathered 310,657 signatures last year to block implementation of the anti-union law until voters could decide. Legislative Republicans pushed the referendum date back to August, instead of the November ballot, to suppress turnout.

Categories: Labor Notes

Viewpoint: How to Talk with Nonunion Workers about ‘Right to Work’

Magazine Stories - Tue, 2018-08-07 15:11

Today Missouri voters are at the polls in a referendum to repeal the state’s “right-to-work” law, thanks to the heroic efforts of union members and allies who gathered 310,657 signatures last year to block implementation of the anti-union law until voters could decide. Legislative Republicans pushed the referendum date back to August, instead of the November ballot, to suppress turnout.

Categories: Labor Notes

Tech Workers and Flight Attendants Resist Immigrant Family Separation

Steward's Corner - Mon, 2018-08-06 14:15
Tech Workers and Flight Attendants Resist Immigrant Family Separation August 06, 2018 / Chris Brooks<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

The brutal and wildly unpopular Trump administration policy that separated thousands of children from their immigrant parents triggered widespread protests.

It also provoked resistance from workers whose jobs are crucial to carrying it out.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) don’t operate in a vacuum. They depend on a host of products and services—including technology produced by software engineers and travel assisted by flight attendants.

Categories: Labor Notes

Tech Workers and Flight Attendants Resist Immigrant Family Separation

Magazine Stories - Mon, 2018-08-06 14:15
Tech Workers and Flight Attendants Resist Immigrant Family Separation August 06, 2018 / Chris Brooks<? if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1) { echo "Print Only"; } ?>

The brutal and wildly unpopular Trump administration policy that separated thousands of children from their immigrant parents triggered widespread protests.

It also provoked resistance from workers whose jobs are crucial to carrying it out.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) don’t operate in a vacuum. They depend on a host of products and services—including technology produced by software engineers and travel assisted by flight attendants.

Categories: Labor Notes
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